160 Thomas Mordue

Biography

Outside right Thomas Mordue joined the Tigers in September 1923 as a teenage goalscorer who had made his reputation in County Durham junior football. Manager Bill McCracken used Mordue sparingly on the right wing, selecting him for three games in the Autumn and three games in mid-March. None of those six games were won, which perhaps influenced the club’s directors and they released Mordue, still only 18, in the 1924 close season.

Thomas Mordue, often known as “Tommy” or “Tucker” during his career, was born in Kimblesworth, a colliery village between Durham and Chester-le-Street, and grew up in the County Durham mining communities of Kimblesworth, Sacriston and Horden. His father was a coal miner born in Edmondsley who lost his life during World War One, placing a reliance on Thomas and his brothers at a young age to earn money for the family. The Mordue family worked at the colliery in Horden, one of the newer 20th century coastal pits that drew coal from deep seams under the North Sea, and was also renowned for its sporting endeavours – Thomas’s brother Billy and several of his cousins were also footballers, while his uncle Jackie Mordue played for Sunderland and won international caps for England in 1912 and 1913. Thomas played for Herrington Swifts in the Wearside League bfore attracting the attentions of Hull City’s extensive scouting system in the North East of England mining communities.

Mordue returned to Horden in 1924 and played a season with Horden Athletic. By November 1925 he was on a hot streak of form that yielded 22 goals in ten matches, whih encouraged Newcastle United to give Thomas a second chance in the professional game. After netting more goals in the Magpies’ reserve side, Mordue scored on his debut against Sheffield United in December 1925 then also scored a crowd pleasing goal against arch-rivals Sunderland. However he managed only five starts as he competed with Scottish international goalscorer Hughie Gallacher for a starting position. In October 1926 he moved to Sheffield United for a £500 fee, and in two seasons with the Blades he made ten starts. In September 1928 he returned to the Durham Coast and signed for Hartlepool United, who were competing in Division Three North, and Mordue found his feet at the Victoria Ground, scoring 27 goals in 104 senior appearances across three seasons including 13 goals in the 1928/29 season. When he left Hartlepool in 1931 he played for local Horden based sides for several more years, often playing alongside his brother Billy. In 1939 he was living in Horden and working in the surface team (rather than underground) at the local colliery. He died in Horden in November 1975.

As well as a footballer, Thomas was an accomplished “Fives” player and won several trophies at the same time as pursuing his football career.

Details

Nationality: England
Date/Place of Birth: 22 June 1905, Kimblesworth
Hull City First Game: 27 October 1923, Stoke A (Division Two), 18 years, 127 days old
Hull City Final Game: 29 March 1924, Barnsley A (Division Two), 18 years, 281 days old

Clubs

Herrington Swifts, Hull City (1923-1924), Horden Athletic (1924-1925), Newcastle United (1925-1926), Sheffield United (1926-1928), Hartlepool United (1928-1931), Horden Colliery Welfare (1931-1936), Horden Coke Ovens (1936-1937)

Hull City Record

Career: 6 apps, 0 goals

Thomas Mordue
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2 thoughts on “160 Thomas Mordue”

  1. Thomas Mordue was my Grandfather, a man who I loved and worshipped.
    Growing up were, very happy times with him as my own father was a civil
    engineer and for the sake of steady schooling, I lived with my grandparents.
    As a youngster, they were very happy times despite money being tight
    rationing was still in place in my early years but they were very happy times.
    I knew my grandad had been a pro footballer, I knew about Jackie Mordue and
    his Sunderland exploits but being a young child we never really asked the important
    questions that we should have done.
    It was only when I turned 18 and would go for a pint in Horden ‘ Big Club ‘ and
    when home on leave from the army taking Grandad out for a pint that I learned
    of his sporting exploits in football and together with Great uncle Billy Handball.
    He was so well respected in the mining community, I would tingle with pride as I
    listened to the old lads talking about him over a pint.
    When my Grandad sadly passed it was like the whole of Horden turned out for his
    funeral, the streets were lined by the community a very fitting tribute to a very remarkable man
    I still miss him and still talk about him to this day, a true, ‘ LOCAL HERO’…

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